Storm Windows Part II

When we left off (in November!!!), we had completed the building of the storm window frames.  All we needed was some warm weather so we could paint!  Somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas we had a few days that I was able to paint.  Yay, Texas!

If you missed Storm Windows Part I, click HERE.

StormWindowIISo here’s where we left off:

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Once the weather warmed up, we primed the frames, caulked any small gaps in the joints, and then painted.  I wanted our signature orange color to show on the outside, but have white showing on the inside, so I painted two different colors, but the choice is yours!

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You guys remember our Easy Guide to Cutting Plexiglass?  We used those easy steps to cut the large sheets of plexiglass (36″x48″) to fit within the frames.

Below are the supplies we used (plus paper towels).  We opted to use a silicone blend caulk instead of glaze because (a) it was cheaper (b) it dries much faster and (c) we didn’t have the weight of real glass to contend with.  We bought glazier’s points to help hold the plexiglass in and used the putty knife to insert the glazier’s points.

Materials

First, we removed the plastic film from both sides of the plexiglass and dry fit them in the frame one more time:

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We put a little glob of caulk in each corner and about ever 6″ along the sides which you can see in the below picture.  We inserted the glazing points by following the directions on the box– basically using a putty knife to rock the point back and forth until it is completely in the wood and holding the plexiglass in place.

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We taped the edges to prevent messy caulking and ran a line of caulk along the gap between the plexiglass and the wood.  We smoothed it out with a combination of fingers and paper towels.  You could use a putty knife or a plastic spoon, but fingers worked best for us!

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We let the caulk dry overnight.  IMG_2524

The following day, we installed the Stanley Screen or Sash hardware that we had purchased from Amazon.

hardware

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Easy as pie, right??

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Man, we’re excited!!  Not bad for a couple of novices, we think!!

I guess we can take the plastic off of the inside of the windows now??

Hope you guys have a Happy New Year!  We’ll be enjoying a slightly less drafty weekend in the Upcycled Ugly pad!

If you missed Storm Windows Part I, click HERE.  If you’d like to see our DIY: Easy Guide to Cutting Plexiglass, click HERE.

2 thoughts on “Storm Windows Part II

  1. Hey Erin,
    That was a fun tutorial, thanks for sharing your adventures! I am thinking of replacing some of the ugly aluminum storm windows one our 1913 home. I want to create sound insulation, some of my neighbors play loud music at times, and I’m going to be setting up a home office soon. So I might put them on the outside of the window casing instead of flush like you did. Apparently the further the storm is from the inside window, the more sound insulation you get…. probably R value too, but not sure. I was going to do interior storms but my wife didn’t like the idea of covering up the historic windows….
    I’m an architect and an artist-painter. Take a look over here at my artwork if you like: http://matthewleestudio.com

    • How wonderful, Matthew! Thanks for stopping by and I’ll be sure to visit your artwork website soon!

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